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Wordnet 3.0

NOUN (2)

1. a formal message requesting something that is submitted to an authority;
[syn: request, petition, postulation]

2. the verbal act of requesting;
[syn: request, asking]


VERB (3)

1. express the need or desire for; ask for;
- Example: "She requested an extra bed in her room"
- Example: "She called for room service"
[syn: request, bespeak, call for, quest]

2. ask (a person) to do something;
- Example: "She asked him to be here at noon"
- Example: "I requested that she type the entire manuscript"

3. inquire for (information);
- Example: "I requested information from the secretary"


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Request \Re*quest"\ (r[-e]*kw[e^]st"), n. [OE. requeste, OF. requeste, F. requ[^e]te, LL. requesta, for requisita, fr. L. requirere, requisitum, to seek again, ask for. See Require, and cf. Quest.] 1. The act of asking for anything desired; expression of desire or demand; solicitation; prayer; petition; entreaty. [1913 Webster] I will marry her, sir, at your request. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. That which is asked for or requested. "He gave them their request." --Ps. cvi. 15. [1913 Webster] I will both hear and grant you your requests. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 3. A state of being desired or held in such estimation as to be sought after or asked for; demand. [1913 Webster] Knowledge and fame were in as great request as wealth among us now. --Sir W. Temple. [1913 Webster] Court of Requests. (a) A local tribunal, sometimes called Court of Consience, founded by act of Parliament to facilitate the recovery of small debts from any inhabitant or trader in the district defined by the act; -- now mostly abolished. (b) A court of equity for the relief of such persons as addressed the sovereign by supplication; -- now abolished. It was inferior to the Court of Chancery. [Eng.] --Brande & C. [1913 Webster] Syn: Asking; solicitation; petition; prayer; supplication; entreaty; suit. [1913 Webster]
The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Request \Re*quest"\ (r?-kw?st"), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Requested; p. pr. & vb. n. Requesting.] [Cf. OF. requester, F. requ[^e]ter.] 1. To ask for (something); to express desire ffor; to solicit; as, to request his presence, or a favor. [1913 Webster] 2. To address with a request; to ask. [1913 Webster] I request you To give my poor host freedom. --Shak. [1913 Webster] Syn: To ask; solicit; entreat; beseech. See Beg. [1913 Webster]
WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006):

request n 1: a formal message requesting something that is submitted to an authority [syn: request, petition, postulation] 2: the verbal act of requesting [syn: request, asking] v 1: express the need or desire for; ask for; "She requested an extra bed in her room"; "She called for room service" [syn: request, bespeak, call for, quest] 2: ask (a person) to do something; "She asked him to be here at noon"; "I requested that she type the entire manuscript" 3: inquire for (information); "I requested information from the secretary"
Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0:

46 Moby Thesaurus words for "request": appeal, application, apply for, ask, ask for, beg, beg leave, beseech, bespeak, call, call for, crave, demand, desire, entreat, entreaty, file for, importune, improper suggestion, indecent proposal, indent, insist on, instance, make a request, make a requisition, make application, motion, order, pass, petition, plea, plead for, pray, proposal, proposition, put in for, requisition, resolution, seek, sexual advance, solicit, solicitation, sue, suggestion, whistle for, wish
Bouvier's Law Dictionary, Revised 6th Ed (1856):

REQUEST, contracts. A notice of a desire on the part of the person making it, that the other party shall do something in relation to a contract. 2. In general when a debt exists payable immediately, the law does not impose on the creditor to make a request of payment. But when by the express terms of a contract, a request is necessary, it must be made. And in some cases where there is no express agreement a request is also requisite; as where A sells a horse to B to be paid for on delivery, a demand or request to deliver must be made before B can sustain an action; 5 T. R. 409; 1 East, 209; or, it must be shown that A has incapacitated himself to deliver the horse because he has sold the horse to another person. 10 East. 359; 5 B. & A. 712. On a general promise to marry, a request must be made before action, unless the proposed defendant has married another. 2 Dow. & Ry. 55. Vide Demand. 3. A request, like a notice, ought to be in writing and state distinctly what is required to be done without any ambiguous terms. 1 Chit. Pr. 497, 498.
Bouvier's Law Dictionary, Revised 6th Ed (1856):

REQUEST, pleading. The statement in the plaintiff's declaration that a demand or request has been made by the plaintiff from the defendant, to do some act which he was bound to perform, and for which the action is brought. 2. A request is general or special. The former is called the licet saepius requisitus, (q.v.) or "although often requested so to do;" though generally inserted in the common breach to the money counts, it is of no avail in pleading, and the omission of it will not vitiate the declaration. 2 Hen. Bl. 131; 1 Bos. & Pull. 59, 60; and see 1 John. Cas. 100. Whenever it is essential to the cause of action, that the plaintiff should have requested the defendant to perform his contract, such request must be stated in the declaration and proved. The special request must state by whom, and the time and place when it was made, in order that the court may judge of its sufficiency. 1 Str. 89, Vide Com. Dig. Pleader, C 69, 70; 1 Saund. 33; 2 Ventr. 75; 3 Bos. & Pull. 438; 3 John. R. 207; 1 John. Cas. 319; 10 Mass. R. 230; 3 Day's R. 327; and the articles Demand; Licet saepius requisitus.