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Search Result for "lurch": 
Wordnet 3.0

NOUN (4)

1. an unsteady uneven gait;
[syn: lurch, stumble, stagger]

2. a decisive defeat in a game (especially in cribbage);

3. abrupt up-and-down motion (as caused by a ship or other conveyance);
- Example: "the pitching and tossing was quite exciting"
[syn: lurch, pitch, pitching]

4. the act of moving forward suddenly;
[syn: lurch, lunge]


VERB (5)

1. walk as if unable to control one's movements;
- Example: "The drunken man staggered into the room"
[syn: stagger, reel, keel, lurch, swag, careen]

2. move abruptly;
- Example: "The ship suddenly lurched to the left"
[syn: lurch, pitch, shift]

3. move slowly and unsteadily;
- Example: "The truck lurched down the road"

4. loiter about, with no apparent aim;
[syn: prowl, lurch]

5. defeat by a lurch;
[syn: lurch, skunk]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Lurch \Lurch\, n. [OF. lourche name of a game; as adj., deceived, embarrassed.] 1. An old game played with dice and counters; a variety of the game of tables. [1913 Webster] 2. A double score in cribbage for the winner when his adversary has been left in the lurch. [1913 Webster] Lady --- has cried her eyes out on losing a lurch. --Walpole. [1913 Webster] To leave one in the lurch. (a) In the game of cribbage, to leave one's adversary so far behind that the game is won before he has scored thirty-one. (b) To leave one behind; hence, to abandon, or fail to stand by, a person in a difficulty. --Denham. [1913 Webster] But though thou'rt of a different church, I will not leave thee in the lurch. --Hudibras. [1913 Webster]
The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Lurch \Lurch\, v. i. [L. lurcare, lurcari.] To swallow or eat greedily; to devour; hence, to swallow up. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Too far off from great cities, which may hinder business; too near them, which lurcheth all provisions, and maketh everything dear. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]
The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Lurch \Lurch\, v. t. 1. To leave in the lurch; to cheat. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Never deceive or lurch the sincere communicant. --South. [1913 Webster] 2. To steal; to rob. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] And in the brunt of seventeen battles since He lurched all swords of the garland. --Shak. [1913 Webster]
The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Lurch \Lurch\, n. [Cf. W. llerch, llerc, a frisk, a frisking backward or forward, a loitering, a lurking, a lurking, llercian, llerciaw, to be idle, to frisk; or perh. fr. E. lurch to lurk.] A sudden roll of a ship to one side, as in heavy weather; hence, a swaying or staggering movement to one side, as that by a drunken man. Fig.: A sudden and capricious inclination of the mind. [1913 Webster]
The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Lurch \Lurch\ (l[^u]rch), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Lurched (l[^u]rcht); p. pr. & vb. n. Lurching.] To roll or sway suddenly to one side, as a ship or a drunken man; to move forward while lurching. [1913 Webster +PJC]
The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Lurch \Lurch\, v. i. [A variant of lurk.] 1. To withdraw to one side, or to a private place; to lurk. --L'Estrange. [1913 Webster] 2. To dodge; to shift; to play tricks. [1913 Webster] I . . . am fain to shuffle, to hedge, and to lurch. --Shak. [1913 Webster]
WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006):

lurch n 1: an unsteady uneven gait [syn: lurch, stumble, stagger] 2: a decisive defeat in a game (especially in cribbage) 3: abrupt up-and-down motion (as caused by a ship or other conveyance); "the pitching and tossing was quite exciting" [syn: lurch, pitch, pitching] 4: the act of moving forward suddenly [syn: lurch, lunge] v 1: walk as if unable to control one's movements; "The drunken man staggered into the room" [syn: stagger, reel, keel, lurch, swag, careen] 2: move abruptly; "The ship suddenly lurched to the left" [syn: lurch, pitch, shift] 3: move slowly and unsteadily; "The truck lurched down the road" 4: loiter about, with no apparent aim [syn: prowl, lurch] 5: defeat by a lurch [syn: lurch, skunk]
Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0:

189 Moby Thesaurus words for "lurch": abandon, amble, barge, bend, bent, bias, blunder, bob, bobble, bowl along, bumble, bundle, capsize, careen, career, clump, coggle, come a cropper, crook, dangle, desert, disposition, drag, droop, drop, fall, fall down, fall flat, fall headlong, fall over, fall prostrate, falter, flounce, flounder, fluctuate, flutter, foot, footslog, forsake, gait, gallop, get a cropper, halt, heave, heel, hippety-hop, hitch, hobble, hobbyhorse, hop, inclination, jilt, jog, jolt, jump, labor, librate, limp, list, lock step, lug, lumber, lunge, make heavy weather, mince, mincing steps, nutate, oscillate, pace, paddle, peg, penchant, pendulate, piaffe, piaffer, pitch, pitch and plunge, pitch and toss, plod, plunge, pound, prance, predilection, predisposition, proclivity, propensity, rack, rear, reel, resonate, rock, roll, sashay, saunter, scend, scuff, scuffle, scuttle, seethe, shake, shamble, sheer, shuffle, sidle, single-foot, skew, skip, slink, slither, slog, slouch, slowness, slue, snap, snapper, sprawl, spread-eagle, stagger, stalk, stammer, stamp, step, stomp, straddle, straggle, stride, stroll, strolling gait, struggle, strut, stumble, stump, swag, swagger, sway, swerve, swing, swinging, take a fall, take a flop, take a header, take a pratfall, take a spill, tendency, thrash about, tilt, tilter, tittup, toddle, topple, topple down, topple over, toss, toss and tumble, toss and turn, totter, traipse, tread, trip, trot, trudge, tumble, turn, turn turtle, twist, twitch, vacillate, veer, vellicate, velocity, vibrate, volutation, waddle, wag, waggle, walk, wallop, wallow, wamble, warp, wave, waver, weave, welter, whirl, wiggle, wobble, yank, yaw