Search Result for "wo":

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Wo \Wo\, n. & a. See Woe. [Obs.] --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]
The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Woe \Woe\, n. [OE. wo, wa, woo, AS. w[=a], interj.; akin to D. wee, OS. & OHG. w[=e], G. weh, Icel. vei, Dan. vee, Sw. ve, Goth. wai; cf. L. vae, Gr. ?. [root]128. Cf. Wail.] [Formerly written also wo.] [1913 Webster] 1. Grief; sorrow; misery; heavy calamity. [1913 Webster] Thus saying, from her side the fatal key, Sad instrument of all our woe, she took. --Milton. [1913 Webster] [They] weep each other's woe. --Pope. [1913 Webster] 2. A curse; a malediction. [1913 Webster] Can there be a woe or curse in all the stores of vengeance equal to the malignity of such a practice? --South. [1913 Webster] Note: Woe is used in denunciation, and in exclamations of sorrow. " Woe is me! for I am undone." --Isa. vi. 5. [1913 Webster] O! woe were us alive [i.e., in life]. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster] Woe unto him that striveth with his Maker! --Isa. xlv. 9. [1913 Webster] Woe worth, Woe be to. See Worth, v. i. [1913 Webster] Woe worth the chase, woe worth the day, That costs thy life, my gallant gray! --Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster]
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (18 May 2012):

WebObjects WO Apple Computer, Inc.'s application server framework for developing dynamic web applications. WebObjects applications accept HTTP requests either directly (usually on a specific port) or via an adaptor that sits between them and the web server. Adaptors are either CGI programs or web server plug-ins (NSAPI or ISAPI). The server processes special tags in HTML pages to produce dynamic but standard HTML. Tools are provided to easily set and get object properties and invoke methods from these tags. Applications can maintain state over multiple HTTP request-response transactions (which are intrinsically stateless). Applications can also use Apple's Enterprise Object Framework object relational mapping libraries for object persistence and database access. WebObjects was originally based on Objective C and a simple scripting language but now is more likely to be used with Java. Versions are available for OS X, Windows and Unix. Apple acquired WebObjects from NeXT, along with Steve Jobs. WebObjects Home (http://apple.com/webobjects/). (2005-01-14)




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