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Wordnet 3.0

NOUN (2)

1. someone who is dazzlingly skilled in any field;
[syn: ace, adept, champion, sensation, maven, mavin, virtuoso, genius, hotshot, star, superstar, whiz, whizz, wizard, wiz]

2. one who practices magic or sorcery;
[syn: sorcerer, magician, wizard, necromancer, thaumaturge, thaumaturgist]


ADJECTIVE (1)

1. possessing or using or characteristic of or appropriate to supernatural powers;
- Example: "charming incantations"
- Example: "magic signs that protect against adverse influence"
- Example: "a magical spell"
- Example: "'tis now the very witching time of night"- Shakespeare
- Example: "wizard wands"
- Example: "wizardly powers"
[syn: charming, magic, magical, sorcerous, witching(a), wizard(a), wizardly]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Wizard \Wiz"ard\, a. 1. Enchanting; charming. --Collins. [1913 Webster] 2. Haunted by wizards. [1913 Webster] Where Deva spreads her wizard stream. --Milton. [1913 Webster]
The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Wizard \Wiz"ard\, n. [Probably from wise + -ard.] 1. A wise man; a sage. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] See how from far upon the eastern road The star-led wizards [Magi] haste with odors sweet! --Milton. [1913 Webster] 2. One devoted to the black art; a magician; a conjurer; a sorcerer; an enchanter. [1913 Webster] The wily wizard must be caught. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]
WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006):

wizard adj 1: possessing or using or characteristic of or appropriate to supernatural powers; "charming incantations"; "magic signs that protect against adverse influence"; "a magical spell"; "'tis now the very witching time of night"- Shakespeare; "wizard wands"; "wizardly powers" [syn: charming, magic, magical, sorcerous, witching(a), wizard(a), wizardly] n 1: someone who is dazzlingly skilled in any field [syn: ace, adept, champion, sensation, maven, mavin, virtuoso, genius, hotshot, star, superstar, whiz, whizz, wizard, wiz] 2: one who practices magic or sorcery [syn: sorcerer, magician, wizard, necromancer, thaumaturge, thaumaturgist]
Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0:

87 Moby Thesaurus words for "wizard": Comus, Faust, OK, ace, ace-high, artist, authority, bad, bang-up, bonzer, boss, bully, but good, conjurer, cool, corking, crackerjack, dandy, delicious, diabolist, diviner, dowser, ducky, enchanter, fab, fine and dandy, first-rater, gear, genius, good hand, great, groovy, heavy, hot, hunky-dory, jam-up, just dandy, keen, mage, magician, magus, mahatma, man of genius, marvy, master, master hand, mastermind, mean, miracle-worker, neat, necromancer, nifty, nobby, okay, out of sight, past master, peachy, peachy-keen, practiced hand, prodigy, professional, proficient, ripping, rum, sage, scrumptious, skilled hand, slap-up, smashing, solid, something else, sorcerer, spiffing, spiffy, star, stunning, superstar, swell, thaumaturge, thaumaturgist, theurgist, topnotcher, tough, virtuoso, warlock, water witch, whiz
The Jargon File (version 4.4.7, 29 Dec 2003):

wizard n. 1. Transitively, a person who knows how a complex piece of software or hardware works (that is, who groks it); esp. someone who can find and fix bugs quickly in an emergency. Someone is a hacker if he or she has general hacking ability, but is a wizard with respect to something only if he or she has specific detailed knowledge of that thing. A good hacker could become a wizard for something given the time to study it. 2. The term ?wizard? is also used intransitively of someone who has extremely high-level hacking or problem-solving ability. 3. A person who is permitted to do things forbidden to ordinary people; one who has wheel privileges on a system. 4. A Unix expert, esp. a Unix systems programmer. This usage is well enough established that ?Unix Wizard? is a recognized job title at some corporations and to most headhunters. See guru, lord high fixer. See also deep magic, heavy wizardry, incantation, magic, mutter, rain dance, voodoo programming, wave a dead chicken.
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (18 March 2015):

wizard 1. A person who knows how a complex piece of software or hardware works (that is, who groks it); especially someone who can find and fix bugs quickly in an emergency. Someone is a hacker if he or she has general hacking ability, but is a wizard with respect to something only if he or she has specific detailed knowledge of that thing. A good hacker could become a wizard for something given the time to study it. 2. A person who is permitted to do things forbidden to ordinary people; one who has wheel privileges on a system. 3. A Unix expert, especially a Unix systems programmer. This usage is well enough established that "Unix Wizard" is a recognised job title at some corporations and to most headhunters. See guru, lord high fixer. See also deep magic, heavy wizardry, incantation, magic, mutter, rain dance, voodoo programming, wave a dead chicken. 4. An interactive help utility that guides the user through a potentially complex task, such as configuring a PPP driver to work with a new modem. Wizards are often implemented as a sequence of dialog boxes which the user can move forward and backward through, filling in the details required. The implication is that the expertise of a human wizard in one of the above senses is encapsulated in the software wizard, allowing the average user to perform expertly. [Jargon File] (1998-09-07)
Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary:

Wizard a pretender to supernatural knowledge and power, "a knowing one," as the original Hebrew word signifies. Such an one was forbidden on pain of death to practise his deceptions (Lev. 19:31; 20:6, 27; 1 Sam. 28:3; Isa. 8:19; 19:3).