Search Result for "wedged": 
Wordnet 3.0

ADJECTIVE (1)

1. wedged or packed in together;
- Example: "an impacted tooth"
[syn: impacted, wedged]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Wedge \Wedge\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Wedged; p. pr. & vb. n. Wedging.] [1913 Webster] 1. To cleave or separate with a wedge or wedges, or as with a wedge; to rive. "My heart, as wedged with a sigh, would rive in twain." --Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To force or drive as a wedge is driven. [1913 Webster] Among the crowd in the abbey where a finger Could not be wedged in more. --Shak. [1913 Webster] He 's just the sort of man to wedge himself into a snug berth. --Mrs. J. H. Ewing. [1913 Webster] 3. To force by crowding and pushing as a wedge does; as, to wedge one's way. --Milton. [1913 Webster] 4. To press closely; to fix, or make fast, in the manner of a wedge that is driven into something. [1913 Webster] Wedged in the rocky shoals, and sticking fast. --Dryden. [1913 Webster] 5. To fasten with a wedge, or with wedges; as, to wedge a scythe on the snath; to wedge a rail or a piece of timber in its place. [1913 Webster] 6. (Pottery) To cut, as clay, into wedgelike masses, and work by dashing together, in order to expel air bubbles, etc. --Tomlinson. [1913 Webster]
WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006):

wedged adj 1: wedged or packed in together; "an impacted tooth" [syn: impacted, wedged]
Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0:

30 Moby Thesaurus words for "wedged": aground, anchored, bonded, caught, cemented, chained, close, fast, fastened, firm, fixed, glued, grounded, held, high and dry, impacted, inextricable, jammed, moored, packed, secure, set, stranded, stuck, stuck fast, taped, tethered, tied, tight, transfixed
The Jargon File (version 4.4.7, 29 Dec 2003):

wedged adj. 1. To be stuck, incapable of proceeding without help. This is different from having crashed. If the system has crashed, it has become totally non-functioning. If the system is wedged, it is trying to do something but cannot make progress; it may be capable of doing a few things, but not be fully operational. For example, a process may become wedged if it deadlock s with another (but not all instances of wedging are deadlocks). See also gronk, locked up, hosed, hung (wedged is more severe than hung). 2. Often refers to humans suffering misconceptions. ?He's totally wedged ? he's convinced that he can levitate through meditation.? 3. [Unix] Specifically used to describe the state of a TTY left in a losing state by abort of a screen-oriented program or one that has messed with the line discipline in some obscure way. There is some dispute over the origin of this term. It is usually thought to derive from a common description of recto-cranial inversion; however, it may actually have originated with older ?hot-press? printing technology in which physical type elements were locked into type frames with wedges driven in by mallets. Once this had been done, no changes in the typesetting for that page could be made.
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (18 March 2015):

wedged 1. To be stuck, incapable of proceeding without help. This is different from having crashed. If the system has crashed, it has become totally non-functioning. If the system is wedged, it is trying to do something but cannot make progress; it may be capable of doing a few things, but not be fully operational. For example, a process may become wedged if it deadlocks with another (but not all instances of wedging are deadlocks). See also gronk, locked up, hosed. 2. Often refers to humans suffering misconceptions. "He's totally wedged - he's convinced that he can levitate through meditation." 3. [Unix] Specifically used to describe the state of a TTY left in a losing state by abort of a screen-oriented program or one that has messed with the line discipline in some obscure way. There is some dispute over the origin of this term. It is usually thought to derive from a common description of recto-cranial inversion; however, it may actually have originated with older "hot-press" printing technology in which physical type elements were locked into type frames with wedges driven in by mallets. Once this had been done, no changes in the typesetting for that page could be made. [Jargon File]