Search Result for "small": 
Wordnet 3.0

NOUN (2)

1. the slender part of the back;

2. a garment size for a small person;


ADJECTIVE (10)

1. limited or below average in number or quantity or magnitude or extent;
- Example: "a little dining room"
- Example: "a little house"
- Example: "a small car"
- Example: "a little (or small) group"
[syn: small, little]

2. limited in size or scope;
- Example: "a small business"
- Example: "a newspaper with a modest circulation"
- Example: "small-scale plans"
- Example: "a pocket-size country"
[syn: minor, modest, small, small-scale, pocket-size, pocket-sized]

3. (of children and animals) young, immature;
- Example: "what a big little boy you are"
- Example: "small children"
[syn: little, small]

4. slight or limited; especially in degree or intensity or scope;
- Example: "a series of death struggles with small time in between"

5. low or inferior in station or quality;
- Example: "a humble cottage"
- Example: "a lowly parish priest"
- Example: "a modest man of the people"
- Example: "small beginnings"
[syn: humble, low, lowly, modest, small]

6. lowercase;
- Example: "little a"
- Example: "small a"
- Example: "e.e.cummings's poetry is written all in minuscule letters"
[syn: little, minuscule, small]

7. (of a voice) faint;
- Example: "a little voice"
- Example: "a still small voice"
[syn: little, small]

8. have fine or very small constituent particles;
- Example: "a small misty rain"

9. not large but sufficient in size or amount;
- Example: "a modest salary"
- Example: "modest inflation"
- Example: "helped in my own small way"
[syn: modest, small]

10. made to seem smaller or less (especially in worth);
- Example: "her comments made me feel small"
[syn: belittled, diminished, small]


ADVERB (1)

1. on a small scale;
- Example: "think small"

perl: warning: Please check that your locale settings:
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7 definitions retrieved:

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Small \Small\, v. t. To make little or less. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]
The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Small \Small\ (sm[add]l), a. [Compar. Smaller (sm[add]l"[~e]r); superl. Smallest.] [OE. small, AS. smael; akin to D. smal narrow, OS. & OHG. smal small, G. schmal narrow, Dan. & Sw. smal, Goth. smals small, Icel. smali small cattle, sheep, or goats; cf. Gr. mh^lon a sheep or goat.] 1. Having little size, compared with other things of the same kind; little in quantity or degree; diminutive; not large or extended in dimension; not great; not much; inconsiderable; as, a small man; a small river. [1913 Webster] To compare Great things with small. --Milton. [1913 Webster] 2. Being of slight consequence; feeble in influence or importance; unimportant; trivial; insignificant; as, a small fault; a small business. [1913 Webster] 3. Envincing little worth or ability; not large-minded; -- sometimes, in reproach, paltry; mean. [1913 Webster] A true delineation of the smallest man is capable of interesting the greatest man. --Carlyle. [1913 Webster] 4. Not prolonged in duration; not extended in time; short; as, after a small space. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 5. Weak; slender; fine; gentle; soft; not loud. "A still, small voice." --1 Kings xix. 12. [1913 Webster] Great and small,of all ranks or degrees; -- used especially of persons. "His quests, great and small." --Chaucer. Small arms, muskets, rifles, pistols, etc., in distinction from cannon. Small beer. See under Beer. Small coal. (a) Little coals of wood formerly used to light fires. --Gay. (b) Coal about the size of a hazelnut, separated from the coarser parts by screening. Small craft (Naut.), a vessel, or vessels in general, of a small size. Small fruits. See under Fruit. Small hand, a certain size of paper. See under Paper. Small hours. See under Hour. Small letter. (Print.), a lower-case letter. See Lower-case, and Capital letter, under Capital, a. Small piece, a Scotch coin worth about 21/4d. sterling, or about 41/2cents. Small register. See the Note under 1st Register, 7. Small stuff (Naut.), spun yarn, marline, and the smallest kinds of rope. --R. H. Dana, Jr. Small talk, light or trifling conversation; chitchat. Small wares (Com.), various small textile articles, as tapes, braid, tringe, and the like. --M`Culloch. [1913 Webster]
The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Small \Small\, adv. 1. In or to small extent, quantity, or degree; little; slightly. [Obs.] "I wept but small." --Chaucer. "It small avails my mood." --Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. Not loudly; faintly; timidly. [Obs. or Humorous] [1913 Webster] You may speak as small as you will. --Shak. [1913 Webster]
The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Small \Small\, n. 1. The small or slender part of a thing; as, the small of the leg or of the back. [1913 Webster] 2. pl. Smallclothes. [Colloq.] --Hood. Dickens. [1913 Webster] 3. pl. Same as Little go. See under Little, a. [1913 Webster]
WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006):

small adv 1: on a small scale; "think small" [ant: big] adj 1: limited or below average in number or quantity or magnitude or extent; "a little dining room"; "a little house"; "a small car"; "a little (or small) group" [syn: small, little] [ant: big, large] 2: limited in size or scope; "a small business"; "a newspaper with a modest circulation"; "small-scale plans"; "a pocket- size country" [syn: minor, modest, small, small- scale, pocket-size, pocket-sized] 3: (of children and animals) young, immature; "what a big little boy you are"; "small children" [syn: little, small] 4: slight or limited; especially in degree or intensity or scope; "a series of death struggles with small time in between" 5: low or inferior in station or quality; "a humble cottage"; "a lowly parish priest"; "a modest man of the people"; "small beginnings" [syn: humble, low, lowly, modest, small] 6: lowercase; "little a"; "small a"; "e.e.cummings's poetry is written all in minuscule letters" [syn: little, minuscule, small] 7: (of a voice) faint; "a little voice"; "a still small voice" [syn: little, small] 8: have fine or very small constituent particles; "a small misty rain" 9: not large but sufficient in size or amount; "a modest salary"; "modest inflation"; "helped in my own small way" [syn: modest, small] 10: made to seem smaller or less (especially in worth); "her comments made me feel small" [syn: belittled, diminished, small] n 1: the slender part of the back 2: a garment size for a small person
Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0:

291 Moby Thesaurus words for "small": Lenten, Lilliputian, Spartan, abject, abominable, abstemious, airy, arrant, ascetic, atrocious, attenuate, attenuated, austere, authoritarian, baby, back-burner, bantam, base, beggarly, bigot, bigoted, borne, boyish, cheap, cheesy, close, closed, commonplace, constricted, contemptible, cramped, creedbound, crummy, cursory, deaf, deaf to reason, debased, deficient, degraded, delicate, depraved, depthless, despicable, diaphanous, diluted, diminished, diminutive, dinky, dirty, disgusting, dispensable, dwarfed, dwarfish, elfin, ethereal, everyday, execrable, exiguous, fanatical, few, fine, fine-drawn, finespun, flagrant, flat, flimsy, footling, foul, frail, frugal, fulsome, gauzy, girlish, gossamer, gracile, grave, gross, grudging, half-pint, heinous, hidebound, homely, humble, humble-looking, humble-visaged, humblest, illiberal, immaterial, immature, imperfect, impoverished, in a nutshell, in miniature, in the small, inadequate, inappreciable, incompetent, inconsequential, inconsiderable, inessential, inferior, inglorious, innocuous, insignificant, insubstantial, insufficient, insular, irrelevant, jejune, knee-high, lacy, lean, least, lesser, light, limited, little, little-minded, low, low-down, lowest, lowliest, lowly, lumpen, maladroit, mangy, matter-of-fact, meager, mean, mean-minded, mean-spirited, measly, mediocre, midget, mingy, mini, miniature, minor, minuscule, minute, miserable, miserly, misty, modest, monkey, monstrous, mundane, narrow, narrow-hearted, narrow-minded, narrow-souled, narrow-spirited, nearsighted, nefarious, negligible, niggardly, no great shakes, nonessential, not comparable, not in it, not vital, nugatory, obnoxious, odious, one-horse, out of it, paltry, papery, parochial, parsimonious, peewee, petit, petite, petty, picayune, picayunish, piddling, pindling, pint-sized, plain, pocket-sized, poky, poor, provincial, puny, purblind, rank, rare, rarefied, reduced, reptilian, scabby, scant, scanty, scrawny, scrimp, scrimpy, scrubby, scruffy, scummy, scurvy, secondary, selfish, shabby, shallow, shoddy, short, shortsighted, simple, skimp, skimpy, skin-deep, slender, slenderish, slight, slight-made, slightly, slim, slimmish, slinky, small-minded, small-scale, smallish, smally, spare, sparing, squalid, starvation, stingy, stinted, stinting, straitened, straitlaced, stuffy, stunted, subsistence, subtle, superficial, svelte, sylphlike, teachable, technical, teeny, tenuous, thin, thin-bodied, thin-set, thin-spun, thinnish, threadlike, tight, tight-fisted, tiny, trifling, trivial, two-by-four, two-dimensional, uncatholic, uncharitable, unchivalrous, undersized, undistinguished, unessential, ungenerous, unimaginative, unimportant, unimpressive, uninspired, unliberal, unmentionable, unnoteworthy, unnourishing, unnutritious, unoriginal, unpretentious, unprofound, unsatisfactory, unskillful, vague, vile, wasp-waisted, watered, watered-down, watery, weak, wee, willowy, wiredrawn, wispy, wretched, young
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (18 March 2015):

SMALL 1. Functional, lazy, untyped. ["SMALL - A Small Interactive Functional System", L. Augustsson, TR 28, U Goteborg and Chalmers U, 1986]. 2. A toy language used to illustrate denotational semantics. ["The Denotational Description of Programming Languages", M.J.C. Gordon, Springer 1979].