Search Result for "potable": 
Wordnet 3.0

NOUN (1)

1. any liquid suitable for drinking;
- Example: "may I take your beverage order?"
[syn: beverage, drink, drinkable, potable]


ADJECTIVE (1)

1. suitable for drinking;
[syn: drinkable, potable]

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4 definitions retrieved:

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Potable \Po"ta*ble\, a. [F., fr. L. potabilis, fr. potare to drink; akin to Gr. po`tos a drinking, po`sis a drink, Skr. p[=a] to drink, OIr. ibim I drink. Cf. Poison, Bib, Imbibe.] Fit to be drunk; drinkable. "Water fresh and potable." --Bacon. -- n. A potable liquid; a beverage. "Useful in potables." --J. Philips. [1913 Webster]
WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006):

potable adj 1: suitable for drinking [syn: drinkable, potable] [ant: undrinkable] n 1: any liquid suitable for drinking; "may I take your beverage order?" [syn: beverage, drink, drinkable, potable]
Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0:

45 Moby Thesaurus words for "potable": John Barleycorn, alcohol, alcoholic beverage, alcoholic drink, aqua vitae, ardent spirits, beverage, booze, brew, drink, drinkable, frosted, frosted shake, grog, hard liquor, inebriant, intoxicant, intoxicating liquor, liquid, liquor, little brown jug, malt, pop, potation, punch bowl, rum, schnapps, shake, social lubricant, soda, soda pop, soda water, soft drink, spirits, strong drink, strong waters, the Demon Rum, the bottle, the cup, the flowing bowl, the luscious liquor, the ruddy cup, tonic, toxicant, water of life
The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906):

POTABLE, n. Suitable for drinking. Water is said to be potable; indeed, some declare it our natural beverage, although even they find it palatable only when suffering from the recurrent disorder known as thirst, for which it is a medicine. Upon nothing has so great and diligent ingenuity been brought to bear in all ages and in all countries, except the most uncivilized, as upon the invention of substitutes for water. To hold that this general aversion to that liquid has no basis in the preservative instinct of the race is to be unscientific -- and without science we are as the snakes and toads.