Search Result for "pie": 
Wordnet 3.0

NOUN (2)

1. dish baked in pastry-lined pan often with a pastry top;

2. a prehistoric unrecorded language that was the ancestor of all Indo-European languages;
[syn: Proto-Indo European, PIE]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Pi \Pi\ (p[imac]), n. [See Pica, Pie magpie, service-book.] (Print.) A mass of type confusedly mixed or unsorted. [Written also pie.] [1913 Webster]
The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Pi \Pi\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Pied; p. pr. & vb. n. Pieing.] (Print.) To put into a mixed and disordered condition, as type; to mix and disarrange the type of; as, to pi a form. [Written also pie.] [1913 Webster]
The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Pie \Pie\, n. [OE. pie, pye; cf. Ir. & Gael. pighe pie, also Gael. pige an earthen jar or pot. Cf. Piggin.] 1. An article of food consisting of paste baked with something in it or under it; as, chicken pie; venison pie; mince pie; apple pie; pumpkin pie. [1913 Webster] 2. See Camp, n., 5. [Prov. Eng.] --Halliwell. [1913 Webster] Pie crust, the paste of a pie. [1913 Webster]
The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Pie \Pie\, n. [F. pie, L. pica; cf. picus woodpecker, pingere to paint; the bird being perhaps named from its colors. Cf. Pi, Paint, Speight.] 1. (Zool.) (a) A magpie. (b) Any other species of the genus Pica, and of several allied genera. [Written also pye.] [1913 Webster] 2. (R. C. Ch.) The service book. [1913 Webster] 3. (Pritn.) Type confusedly mixed. See Pi. [1913 Webster] By cock and pie, an adjuration equivalent to "by God and the service book." --Shak. Tree pie (Zool.), any Asiatic bird of the genus Dendrocitta, allied to the magpie. Wood pie. (Zool.) See French pie, under French. [1913 Webster]
The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Pie \Pie\, v. t. See Pi. [1913 Webster]
The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Camp \Camp\ (k[a^]mp), n. [F. camp, It. campo, fr. L. campus plant, field; akin to Gr. kh^pos garden. Cf. Campaign, Champ, n.] 1. The ground or spot on which tents, huts, etc., are erected for shelter, as for an army or for lumbermen, etc. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. A collection of tents, huts, etc., for shelter, commonly arranged in an orderly manner. [1913 Webster] Forming a camp in the neighborhood of Boston. --W. Irving. [1913 Webster] 3. A single hut or shelter; as, a hunter's camp. [1913 Webster] 4. The company or body of persons encamped, as of soldiers, of surveyors, of lumbermen, etc. [1913 Webster] The camp broke up with the confusion of a flight. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster] 5. (Agric.) A mound of earth in which potatoes and other vegetables are stored for protection against frost; -- called also burrow and pie. [Prov. Eng.] [1913 Webster] 6. [Cf. OE. & AS. camp contest, battle. See champion.] An ancient game of football, played in some parts of England. --Halliwell. [1913 Webster] Camp bedstead, a light bedstead that can be folded up onto a small space for easy transportation. camp ceiling (Arch.), a kind ceiling often used in attics or garrets, in which the side walls are inclined inward at the top, following the slope of the rafters, to meet the plane surface of the upper ceiling. Camp chair, a light chair that can be folded up compactly for easy transportation; the seat and back are often made of strips or pieces of carpet. Camp fever, typhus fever. Camp follower, a civilian accompanying an army, as a sutler, servant, etc. Camp meeting, a religious gathering for open-air preaching, held in some retired spot, chiefly by Methodists. It usually last for several days, during which those present lodge in tents, temporary houses, or cottages. Camp stool, the same as camp chair, except that the stool has no back. Flying camp (Mil.), a camp or body of troops formed for rapid motion from one place to another. --Farrow. To pitch (a) camp, to set up the tents or huts of a camp. To strike camp, to take down the tents or huts of a camp. [1913 Webster]
WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006):

pie n 1: dish baked in pastry-lined pan often with a pastry top 2: a prehistoric unrecorded language that was the ancestor of all Indo-European languages [syn: Proto-Indo European, PIE]
Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0:

74 Moby Thesaurus words for "pie": Danish pastry, Deutschmark, French pastry, Mark, Reichsmark, afghani, anna, baht, baklava, blintz, breeze, cent, centavo, centime, chocolate eclair, cinch, conto, cream puff, dollar, dong, dowdy, easy target, easy thing, eclair, florin, franc, guilder, gulden, kip, kopeck, krona, krone, lira, milreis, pandowdy, pastry, pasty, patisserie, patty, patty-shell, peseta, picnic, piece of cake, piece of eight, pipe, pistareen, pound, puff, pushover, quiche, rand, rial, rosette, ruble, rupee, setup, shekel, shilling, sinecure, sitting duck, snap, sol, sou, stiver, strudel, tart, timbale, tipsy cake, trifle, turnover, velvet, vol-au-vent, won, yen
V.E.R.A. -- Virtual Entity of Relevant Acronyms (September 2014):

PIE Personal Interactive Electronics [division] (Apple)
V.E.R.A. -- Virtual Entity of Relevant Acronyms (September 2014):

PIE Position Independent Executable
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (18 March 2015):

PIE A language from CMU similar to Actus. (1994-11-29)
The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906):

PIE, n. An advance agent of the reaper whose name is Indigestion. Cold pie was highly esteemed by the remains. Rev. Dr. Mucker (in a funeral sermon over a British nobleman) Cold pie is a detestable American comestible. That's why I'm done -- or undone -- So far from that dear London. (from the headstone of a British nobleman in Kalamazoo)