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Search Result for "miscreant": 
Wordnet 3.0

NOUN (1)

1. a person without moral scruples;
[syn: reprobate, miscreant]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Miscreant \Mis"cre*ant\, n. [OF. mescreant, F. m['e]cr['e]ant; pref. mes- (L. minus less) + p. pr. fr. L. credere to believe. See Creed.] [1913 Webster] 1. One who holds a false religious faith; a misbeliever. [Obs.] --Spenser. De Quincey. [1913 Webster] Thou oughtest not to be slothful to the destruction of the miscreants, but to constrain them to obey our Lord God. --Rivers. [1913 Webster] 2. One not restrained by Christian principles; an unscrupulous villain; a depraved person; a vile wretch. --Addison.
The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Miscreant \Mis"cre*ant\, a. 1. Holding a false religious faith. [1913 Webster] 2. Destitute of conscience; unscrupulous; villainous; base; depraved. --Pope. [1913 Webster +PJC]
WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006):

miscreant n 1: a person without moral scruples [syn: reprobate, miscreant]
Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0:

70 Moby Thesaurus words for "miscreant": backslider, bad egg, bad lot, base, bastard, black sheep, blackguard, caitiff, corrupt, criminal, crook, degenerate, depraved, evil, fallen angel, felon, felonious, flagitious, good-for-nothing, heel, hood, hoodlum, hooligan, infamous, iniquitous, knave, lecher, lost sheep, lost soul, lowlife, malefactor, malefic, malevolent, mischief-maker, mischievous, mug, nefarious, perverse, pervert, pimp, profligate, rapscallion, rascal, rascally, recidivist, recreant, reprobate, rogue, rough, roughneck, rowdy, ruffian, scalawag, scamp, scapegrace, scoundrel, scoundrelly, sorry lot, thug, trollop, unhealthy, unprincipled, vicious, villain, villainous, whore, wicked, wretch, wretched, wrongdoer
The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906):

MISCREANT, n. A person of the highest degree of unworth. Etymologically, the word means unbeliever, and its present signification may be regarded as theology's noblest contribution to the development of our language.