Search Result for "bole": 
Wordnet 3.0

NOUN (3)

1. a soft oily clay used as a pigment (especially a reddish brown pigment);

2. the main stem of a tree; usually covered with bark; the bole is usually the part that is commercially useful for lumber;
[syn: trunk, tree trunk, bole]

3. a Chadic language spoken in northern Nigeria and closely related to Hausa;
[syn: Bole, Bolanci]

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8 definitions retrieved:

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Bole \Bole\, n. [OE. bole, fr. Icel. bolr; akin to Sw. b[*a]l, Dan. bul, trunk, stem of a tree, G. bohle a thick plank or board; cf. LG. boll round. Cf. Bulge.] The trunk or stem of a tree, or that which is like it. [1913 Webster] Enormous elm-tree boles did stoop and lean. --Tennyson. [1913 Webster]
The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Bole \Bole\, n. [Etym. doubtful.] An aperture, with a wooden shutter, in the wall of a house, for giving, occasionally, air or light; also, a small closet. [Scot.] [1913 Webster] Open the bole wi'speed, that I may see if this be the right Lord Geraldin. --Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster]
The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Bole \Bole\, n. A measure. See Boll, n., 2. --Mortimer. [1913 Webster]
The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Bole \Bole\, n. [Gr. ? a clod or lump of earth: cf. F. bol, and also L. bolus morsel. Cf. Bolus.] 1. Any one of several varieties of friable earthy clay, usually colored more or less strongly red by oxide of iron, and used to color and adulterate various substances. It was formerly used in medicine. It is composed essentially of hydrous silicates of alumina, or more rarely of magnesia. See Clay, and Terra alba. [1913 Webster] 2. A bolus; a dose. --Coleridge. [1913 Webster] Armenian bole. See under Armenian. Bole Armoniac, or Armoniak, Armenian bole. [Obs.] --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]
The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Boll \Boll\, n. [OE. bolle boll, bowl, AS. bolla. See Bowl a vessel.] 1. The pod or capsule of a plant, as of flax or cotton; a pericarp of a globular form. [1913 Webster] 2. A Scotch measure, formerly in use: for wheat and beans it contained four Winchester bushels; for oats, barley, and potatoes, six bushels. A boll of meal is 140 lbs. avoirdupois. Also, a measure for salt of two bushels. [Sometimes spelled bole.] [1913 Webster]
The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Clay \Clay\ (kl[=a]), n. [AS. cl[=ae]g; akin to LG. klei, D. klei, and perh. to AS. cl[=a]m clay, L. glus, gluten glue, Gr. gloio`s glutinous substance, E. glue. Cf. Clog.] 1. A soft earth, which is plastic, or may be molded with the hands, consisting of hydrous silicate of aluminium. It is the result of the wearing down and decomposition, in part, of rocks containing aluminous minerals, as granite. Lime, magnesia, oxide of iron, and other ingredients, are often present as impurities. [1913 Webster] 2. (Poetry & Script.) Earth in general, as representing the elementary particles of the human body; hence, the human body as formed from such particles. [1913 Webster] I also am formed out of the clay. --Job xxxiii. 6. [1913 Webster] The earth is covered thick with other clay, Which her own clay shall cover. --Byron. [1913 Webster] Bowlder clay. See under Bowlder. Brick clay, the common clay, containing some iron, and therefore turning red when burned. Clay cold, cold as clay or earth; lifeless; inanimate. Clay ironstone, an ore of iron consisting of the oxide or carbonate of iron mixed with clay or sand. Clay marl, a whitish, smooth, chalky clay. Clay mill, a mill for mixing and tempering clay; a pug mill. Clay pit, a pit where clay is dug. Clay slate (Min.), argillaceous schist; argillite. Fatty clays, clays having a greasy feel; they are chemical compounds of water, silica, and aluminia, as halloysite, bole, etc. Fire clay, a variety of clay, entirely free from lime, iron, or an alkali, and therefore infusible, and used for fire brick. Porcelain clay, a very pure variety, formed directly from the decomposition of feldspar, and often called kaolin. Potter's clay, a tolerably pure kind, free from iron. [1913 Webster]
WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006):

bole n 1: a soft oily clay used as a pigment (especially a reddish brown pigment) 2: the main stem of a tree; usually covered with bark; the bole is usually the part that is commercially useful for lumber [syn: trunk, tree trunk, bole] 3: a Chadic language spoken in northern Nigeria and closely related to Hausa [syn: Bole, Bolanci]
Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0:

41 Moby Thesaurus words for "bole": anthrophore, axis, barrel, cane, carpophore, cask, caudex, caulicle, caulis, column, culm, cylinder, cylindroid, drum, footstalk, funicule, funiculus, haulm, leafstalk, pedicel, peduncle, petiole, petiolule, petiolus, pillar, pipe, reed, roll, roller, rouleau, seedstalk, spear, spire, stalk, stem, stipe, stock, straw, tigella, trunk, tube