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Search Result for "baroque": 
Wordnet 3.0

NOUN (2)

1. the historic period from about 1600 until 1750 when the baroque style of art, architecture, and music flourished in Europe;
[syn: Baroque, Baroque era, Baroque period]

2. elaborate and extensive ornamentation in decorative art and architecture that flourished in Europe in the 17th century;
[syn: baroque, baroqueness]


ADJECTIVE (2)

1. having elaborate symmetrical ornamentation;
- Example: "the building...frantically baroque"-William Dean Howells
[syn: baroque, churrigueresque, churrigueresco]

2. of or relating to or characteristic of the elaborately ornamented style of architecture, art, and music popular in Europe between 1600 and 1750;
[syn: baroque, Baroque]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Baroque \Ba*roque"\, a. [F.; cf. It. barocco.] (Arch.) 1. of, pertaining to, or characteristic of, an artistic style common in the 17th century, characterized by the use of complex and elaborate ornamentation, curved rather than straight lines, and, in music a high degree of embellishment. [PJC] 2. Hence, overly complicated, or ornamented to excess; in bad taste; grotesque; odd. [1913 Webster +PJC] 3. Irregular in form; -- said esp. of a pearl. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]
WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006):

baroque adj 1: having elaborate symmetrical ornamentation; "the building...frantically baroque"-William Dean Howells [syn: baroque, churrigueresque, churrigueresco] 2: of or relating to or characteristic of the elaborately ornamented style of architecture, art, and music popular in Europe between 1600 and 1750 [syn: baroque, Baroque] n 1: the historic period from about 1600 until 1750 when the baroque style of art, architecture, and music flourished in Europe [syn: Baroque, Baroque era, Baroque period] 2: elaborate and extensive ornamentation in decorative art and architecture that flourished in Europe in the 17th century [syn: baroque, baroqueness]
Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0:

60 Moby Thesaurus words for "baroque": Gothic, arabesque, bizarre, brain-born, busy, chichi, deformed, dream-built, elaborate, elegant, embellished, extravagant, fanciful, fancy, fancy-born, fancy-built, fancy-woven, fantasque, fantastic, fine, flamboyant, florid, flowery, freak, freakish, frilly, fussy, gilt, grotesque, high-wrought, labored, luscious, luxuriant, luxurious, maggoty, malformed, misbegotten, misshapen, monstrous, moresque, notional, ornamented, ornate, ostentatious, outlandish, overelaborate, overelegant, overlabored, overworked, overwrought, picturesque, preposterous, pretty-pretty, rich, rococo, scrolled, teratogenic, teratoid, whimsical, wild
The Jargon File (version 4.4.7, 29 Dec 2003):

baroque adj. [common] Feature-encrusted; complex; gaudy; verging on excessive. Said of hardware or (esp.) software designs, this has many of the connotations of elephantine or monstrosity but is less extreme and not pejorative in itself. In the absence of other, more negative descriptions this term suggests that the software is trembling on the edge of bad taste but has not quite tipped over into it. ?Metafont even has features to introduce random variations to its letterform output. Now that is baroque!? See also rococo.
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (18 March 2015):

Baroque An early logic programming language written by Boyer and Moore in 1972. ["Computational Logic: Structure Sharing and Proof of program Properties", J. Moore, DCL Memo 67, U Edinburgh 1974]. [Jargon File] (1995-02-22)
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (18 March 2015):

baroque Feature-encrusted; complex; gaudy; verging on excessive. Said of hardware or (especially) software designs, this has many of the connotations of elephantine or monstrosity but is less extreme and not pejorative in itself. "Metafont even has features to introduce random variations to its letterform output. Now *that* is baroque!" See also rococo. [Jargon File] (1995-02-22)