Search Result for "alibi":
Wordnet 3.0

NOUN (2)

1. (law) a defense by an accused person purporting to show that he or she could not have committed the crime in question;

2. a defense of some offensive behavior or some failure to keep a promise etc.;
- Example: "he kept finding excuses to stay"
- Example: "every day he had a new alibi for not getting a job"
- Example: "his transparent self-justification was unacceptable"
[syn: excuse, alibi, exculpation, self-justification]


VERB (1)

1. exonerate by means of an alibi;


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Alibi \Al"i*bi\, n. [L., elsewhere, at another place. See Alias.] (Law) The plea or mode of defense under which a person on trial for a crime proves or attempts to prove that he was in another place when the alleged act was committed; as, to set up an alibi; to prove an alibi. [1913 Webster]
WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006):

alibi n 1: (law) a defense by an accused person purporting to show that he or she could not have committed the crime in question 2: a defense of some offensive behavior or some failure to keep a promise etc.; "he kept finding excuses to stay"; "every day he had a new alibi for not getting a job"; "his transparent self-justification was unacceptable" [syn: excuse, alibi, exculpation, self-justification] v 1: exonerate by means of an alibi
Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0:

54 Moby Thesaurus words for "alibi": alibi out of, apologize for, apology, blind, cloak, color, cop-out, cover, cover story, cover with excuses, cover-up, device, excuse, explain, explanation, facade, feint, front, gloss, guise, handle, lame excuse, lie out of, likely story, locus standi, make apology for, mask, offer excuse for, ostensible motive, out, plea, plead ignorance, poor excuse, pretense, pretension, pretext, protestation, public motive, put-off, refuge, right, screen, semblance, sham, show, smoke screen, squirm out of, stalking-horse, stratagem, subterfuge, trick, varnish, veil, worm out of
Bouvier's Law Dictionary, Revised 6th Ed (1856):

ALIBI, in evidence. This is a Latin word which signifies, elsewhere. 2. When a person, charged with a crime, proves (se eadem die fuisse alibi,) that he was, at the time alleged, in a different place from that in which it was committed, he is said to prove an alibi, the effect of which is to lay a foundation for the necessary inference, that he could not have committed it. See Bract. fo. 140, lib. 3, cap. 20, De Corona. 3. This proof is usually made out by the testimony of witnesses, but it is presumed it might be made out by writings; as if the party could prove by a record properly authenticated, that on the day or at the time in question, he was in another place. 4. It must be admitted that mere alibi evidence lies under a great and general prejudice, and ought to be heard with uncommon caution; but if it appear, to be founded in truth, it is the best negative evidence that can be offered; it is really positive evidence, which in the nature of things necessarily implies a negative; and in many cases it is the only evidence which an innocent man can offer.




Shop Amazon - Best Selling Products - Updated Every Hour