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The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Pass \Pass\ (p[.a]s, p[a^]s), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Passed; p. pr. & vb. n. Passing.] [F. passer, LL. passare, fr. L. passus step, or from pandere, passum, to spread out, lay open. See Pace.] 1. To go; to move; to proceed; to be moved or transferred from one point to another; to make a transit; -- usually with a following adverb or adverbal phrase defining the kind or manner of motion; as, to pass on, by, out, in, etc.; to pass swiftly, directly, smoothly, etc.; to pass to the rear, under the yoke, over the bridge, across the field, beyond the border, etc. "But now pass over [i. e., pass on]." --Chaucer. [1913 Webster] On high behests his angels to and fro Passed frequent. --Milton. [1913 Webster] Sweet sounds rose slowly through their mouths, And from their bodies passed. --Coleridge. [1913 Webster] 2. To move or be transferred from one state or condition to another; to change possession, condition, or circumstances; to undergo transition; as, the business has passed into other hands. [1913 Webster] Others, dissatisfied with what they have, . . . pass from just to unjust. --Sir W. Temple. [1913 Webster] 3. To move beyond the range of the senses or of knowledge; to pass away; hence, to disappear; to vanish; to depart; specifically, to depart from life; to die. [1913 Webster] Disturb him not, let him pass paceably. --Shak. [1913 Webster] Beauty is a charm, but soon the charm will pass. --Dryden. [1913 Webster] The passing of the sweetest soul That ever looked with human eyes. --Tennyson. [1913 Webster] 4. To move or to come into being or under notice; to come and go in consciousness; hence, to take place; to occur; to happen; to come; to occur progressively or in succession; to be present transitorily. [1913 Webster] So death passed upon all men. --Rom. v. 12. [1913 Webster] Our own consciousness of what passes within our own mind. --I. Watts. [1913 Webster] 5. To go by or glide by, as time; to elapse; to be spent; as, their vacation passed pleasantly. [1913 Webster] Now the time is far passed. --Mark vi. 35 [1913 Webster] 6. To go from one person to another; hence, to be given and taken freely; as, clipped coin will not pass; to obtain general acceptance; to be held or regarded; to circulate; to be current; -- followed by for before a word denoting value or estimation. "Let him pass for a man." --Shak. [1913 Webster] False eloquence passeth only where true is not understood. --Felton. [1913 Webster] This will not pass for a fault in him. --Atterbury. [1913 Webster] 7. To advance through all the steps or stages necessary to validity or effectiveness; to be carried through a body that has power to sanction or reject; to receive legislative sanction; to be enacted; as, the resolution passed; the bill passed both houses of Congress. [1913 Webster] 8. To go through any inspection or test successfully; to be approved or accepted; as, he attempted the examination, but did not expect to pass. [1913 Webster] 9. To be suffered to go on; to be tolerated; hence, to continue; to live along. "The play may pass." --Shak. [1913 Webster] 10. To go unheeded or neglected; to proceed without hindrance or opposition; as, we let this act pass. [1913 Webster] 11. To go beyond bounds; to surpass; to be in excess. [Obs.] "This passes, Master Ford." --Shak. [1913 Webster] 12. To take heed; to care. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] As for these silken-coated slaves, I pass not. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 13. To go through the intestines. --Arbuthnot. [1913 Webster] 14. (Law) To be conveyed or transferred by will, deed, or other instrument of conveyance; as, an estate passes by a certain clause in a deed. --Mozley & W. [1913 Webster] 15. (Fencing) To make a lunge or pass; to thrust. [1913 Webster] 16. (Card Playing) To decline to play in one's turn; in euchre, to decline to make the trump. [1913 Webster] She would not play, yet must not pass. --Prior. [1913 Webster] To bring to pass, To come to pass. See under Bring, and Come. To pass away, to disappear; to die; to vanish. "The heavens shall pass away." --2 Pet. iii. 10. "I thought to pass away before, but yet alive I am." --Tennyson. To pass by, to go near and beyond a certain person or place; as, he passed by as we stood there. To pass into, to change by a gradual transmission; to blend or unite with. To pass on, to proceed. To pass on or To pass upon. (a) To happen to; to come upon; to affect. "So death passed upon all men." --Rom. v. 12. "Provided no indirect act pass upon our prayers to define them." --Jer. Taylor. (b) To determine concerning; to give judgment or sentence upon. "We may not pass upon his life." --Shak. To pass off, to go away; to cease; to disappear; as, an agitation passes off. To pass over, to go from one side or end to the other; to cross, as a river, road, or bridge. [1913 Webster]
Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0:

53 Moby Thesaurus words for "passed": accepted, adopted, ago, antiquated, antique, appointed, approved, blown over, by, bygone, bypast, carried, chosen, dated, dead, dead and buried, deceased, defunct, departed, designated, elapsed, elect, elected, elected by acclamation, embraced, espoused, expired, extinct, finished, forgotten, gone, gone glimmering, gone-by, handpicked, has-been, irrecoverable, lapsed, named, no more, nominated, obsolete, over, passe, passed away, past, picked, ratified, run out, select, selected, unanimously elected, vanished, wound up