Search Result for "bolting": 
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4 definitions retrieved:

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Bolt \Bolt\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Bolted; p. pr. & vb. n. Bolting.] 1. To shoot; to discharge or drive forth. [1913 Webster] 2. To utter precipitately; to blurt or throw out. [1913 Webster] I hate when Vice can bolt her arguments. --Milton. [1913 Webster] 3. To swallow without chewing; as, to bolt food; often used with down. [1913 Webster] 4. (U. S. Politics) To refuse to support, as a nomination made by a party to which one has belonged or by a caucus in which one has taken part. [1913 Webster] 5. (Sporting) To cause to start or spring forth; to dislodge, as conies, rabbits, etc. [1913 Webster] 6. To fasten or secure with, or as with, a bolt or bolts, as a door, a timber, fetters; to shackle; to restrain. [1913 Webster] Let tenfold iron bolt my door. --Langhorn. [1913 Webster] Which shackles accidents and bolts up change. --Shak. [1913 Webster]
The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Bolt \Bolt\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Bolted; p. pr. & vb. n. Bolting.] [OE. bolten, boulten, OF. buleter, F. bluter, fr. Ll. buletare, buratare, cf. F. bure coarse woolen stuff; fr. L. burrus red. See Borrel, and cf. Bultel.] [1913 Webster] 1. To sift or separate the coarser from the finer particles of, as bran from flour, by means of a bolter; to separate, assort, refine, or purify by other means. [1913 Webster] He now had bolted all the flour. --Spenser. [1913 Webster] Ill schooled in bolted language. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To separate, as if by sifting or bolting; -- with out. [1913 Webster] Time and nature will bolt out the truth of things. --L'Estrange. [1913 Webster] 3. (Law) To discuss or argue privately, and for practice, as cases at law. --Jacob. [1913 Webster] To bolt to the bran, to examine thoroughly, so as to separate or discover everything important. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster] This bolts the matter fairly to the bran. --Harte. [1913 Webster] The report of the committee was examined and sifted and bolted to the bran. --Burke. [1913 Webster]
The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Bolting \Bolt"ing\, n. A darting away; a starting off or aside. [1913 Webster]
The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Bolting \Bolt"ing\, n. 1. A sifting, as of flour or meal. [1913 Webster] 2. (Law) A private arguing of cases for practice by students, as in the Inns of Court. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Bolting cloth, wire, hair, silk, or other sieve cloth of different degrees of fineness; -- used by millers for sifting flour. --McElrath. Bolting hutch, a bin or tub for the bolted flour or meal; (fig.) a receptacle. [1913 Webster]