Search Result for "virtual reality":
Wordnet 3.0

NOUN (1)

1. a hypothetical three-dimensional visual world created by a computer; user wears special goggles and fiber optic gloves etc., and can enter and move about in this world and interact with objects as if inside it;

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3 definitions retrieved:

WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006):

virtual reality n 1: a hypothetical three-dimensional visual world created by a computer; user wears special goggles and fiber optic gloves etc., and can enter and move about in this world and interact with objects as if inside it
The Jargon File (version 4.4.7, 29 Dec 2003):

virtual reality n. 1. Computer simulations that use 3-D graphics and devices such as the Dataglove to allow the user to interact with the simulation. See cyberspace. 2. A form of network interaction incorporating aspects of role-playing games, interactive theater, improvisational comedy, and ?true confessions? magazines. In a virtual reality forum (such as Usenet's alt.callahans newsgroup or the MUD experiments on Internet), interaction between the participants is written like a shared novel complete with scenery, foreground characters that may be personae utterly unlike the people who write them, and common background characters manipulable by all parties. The one iron law is that you may not write irreversible changes to a character without the consent of the person who ?owns? it. Otherwise anything goes. See bamf, cyberspace, teledildonics.
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (18 March 2015):

virtual reality VR (VR) 1. Computer simulations that use 3D graphics and devices such as the data glove to allow the user to interact with the simulation. 2. A form of network interaction incorporating aspects of role-playing games, interactive theater, improvisational comedy, and "true confessions" magazines. In a virtual reality forum (such as Usenet's news:alt.callahans newsgroup or the MUD experiments on Internet and elsewhere), interaction between the participants is written like a shared novel complete with scenery, "foreground characters" that may be personae utterly unlike the people who write them, and common "background characters" manipulable by all parties. The one iron law is that you may not write irreversible changes to a character without the consent of the person who "owns" it, otherwise, anything goes. See bamf, cyberspace. [Jargon File] (1995-01-30)