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The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Gender \Gen"der\ (j[e^]n"d[~e]r), n. [OF. genre, gendre (with excrescent d.), F.genre, fr. L. genus, generis, birth, descent, race, kind, gender, fr. the root of genere, gignere, to beget, in pass., to be born, akin to E. kin. See Kin, and cf. Generate, Genre, Gentle, Genus.] [1913 Webster] 1. Kind; sort. [Obs.] "One gender of herbs." --Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. Sex, male or female. [1913 Webster] Note: The use of the term gender to refer to the sex of an animal, especially a person, was once common, then fell into disuse as the term became used primarily for the distinction of grammatical declension forms in inflected words. In the late 1900's, the term again became used to refer to the sex of people, as a euphemism for the term sex, especially in discussions of laws and policies on equal treatment of sexes. Objections by prescriptivists that the term should be used only in a grammatical context ignored the earlier uses. [PJC] 3. (Gram.) A classification of nouns, primarily according to sex; and secondarily according to some fancied or imputed quality associated with sex. [1913 Webster] Gender is a grammatical distinction and applies to words only. Sex is natural distinction and applies to living objects. --R. Morris. [1913 Webster] Note: Adjectives and pronouns are said to vary in gender when the form is varied according to the gender of the words to which they refer. [1913 Webster]
The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Sex- \Sex-\ [L. sex six. See Six.] A combining form meaning six; as, sexdigitism; sexennial. [1913 Webster]
The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Sex \Sex\, n. [L. sexus: cf. F. sexe.] 1. The distinguishing peculiarity of male or female in both animals and plants; the physical difference between male and female; the assemblage of properties or qualities by which male is distinguished from female. [1913 Webster] 2. One of the two divisions of organic beings formed on the distinction of male and female. [1913 Webster] 3. (Bot.) (a) The capability in plants of fertilizing or of being fertilized; as, staminate and pistillate flowers are of opposite sexes. (b) One of the groups founded on this distinction. [1913 Webster] The sex, the female sex; women, in general. [1913 Webster]
Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0:

120 Moby Thesaurus words for "sex": Amor, Christian love, Eros, Platonic love, act of love, admiration, adoration, adultery, affection, agape, amorous, aphrodisia, ardency, ardor, ass, attachment, balling, bodily love, brotherly love, caritas, carnal, carnal knowledge, charity, climax, cohabitation, coition, coitus, coitus interruptus, commerce, congress, conjugal love, connection, copula, copulation, coupling, desire, devotion, diddling, erogenic, erogenous, erotic, erotogenic, faithful love, fancy, fervor, flame, fleshly, fondness, fornication, free love, free-lovism, gamic, heart, hero worship, heterosexual, idolatry, idolism, idolization, intercourse, intimacy, lasciviousness, libidinal, libido, like, liking, love, lovemaking, making it with, marital relations, marriage act, married love, mating, meat, nuptial, onanism, orgasm, oversexed, ovum, pareunia, passion, physical love, popular regard, popularity, potent, procreation, procreative, regard, relations, screwing, sensual, sentiment, sex act, sexed, sexlike, sexual, sexual climax, sexual commerce, sexual congress, sexual intercourse, sexual love, sexual relations, sexual union, sexualize, sexy, shine, sleeping with, sperm, spiritual love, straight, tender feeling, tender passion, truelove, undersexed, uxoriousness, venereal, venery, voluptuous, weakness, worship, yearning
Bouvier's Law Dictionary, Revised 6th Ed (1856):

SEX. The physical difference between male and female in animals. 2. In the human species the male is called man, (q.v.) and the female, woman. (q.v.) Some human beings whose sexual organs are somewhat imperfect, have acquired the name of hermaphrodite. (q.v.) 3. In the civil state the sex creates a difference among individuals. Women cannot generally be elected or appointed to offices or service in public capacities. In this our law agrees with that of other nations. The civil law excluded women from all offices civil or public: Faemintae ab omnibus officiis civilibus vel publicis remotae sunt. Dig. 50, 17, 2. The principal reason of this exclusion is to encourage that modesty which is natural to the female sex, and which renders them unqualified to mix and contend with men; the pretended weakness of the sex is not probably the true reason. Poth. Des Personnes, tit. 5; Wood's Inst. 12; Civ. Code of Louis. art. 24; 1 Beck's Med. Juris. 94. Vide Gender; Male; Man; Women; Worthiest of blood.