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The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Prejudice \Prej"u*dice\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Prejudiced; p. pr. & vb. n. Prejudicing.] [Cf. F. pr['e]judicier. See Prejudice, n.] 1. To cause to have prejudice; to prepossess with opinions formed without due knowledge or examination; to bias the mind of, by hasty and incorrect notions; to give an unreasonable bent to, as to one side or the other of a cause; as, to prejudice a critic or a juryman. [1913 Webster] Suffer not any beloved study to prejudice your mind so far as to despise all other learning. --I. Watts [1913 Webster] 2. To obstruct or injure by prejudices, or by previous bias of the mind; hence, generally, to hurt; to damage; to injure; to impair; as, to prejudice a good cause. [1913 Webster] Seek how may prejudice the foe. --Shak [1913 Webster]