Search Result for "black art":
Wordnet 3.0

NOUN (1)

1. the belief in magical spells that harness occult forces or evil spirits to produce unnatural effects in the world;
[syn: sorcery, black magic, black art, necromancy]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48:

Black art \Black" art`\ The art practiced by conjurers and witches; necromancy; conjuration; magic. [1913 Webster] Note: This name was given in the Middle Ages to necromancy, under the idea that the latter term was derived from niger black, instead of nekro`s, a dead person, and mantei`a, divination. --Wright. [1913 Webster]
WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006):

black art n 1: the belief in magical spells that harness occult forces or evil spirits to produce unnatural effects in the world [syn: sorcery, black magic, black art, necromancy]
The Jargon File (version 4.4.7, 29 Dec 2003):

black art n. [common] A collection of arcane, unpublished, and (by implication) mostly ad-hoc techniques developed for a particular application or systems area (compare black magic). VLSI design and compiler code optimization were (in their beginnings) considered classic examples of black art; as theory developed they became deep magic, and once standard textbooks had been written, became merely heavy wizardry. The huge proliferation of formal and informal channels for spreading around new computer-related technologies during the last twenty years has made both the term black art and what it describes less common than formerly. See also voodoo programming.
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (18 March 2015):

black art A collection of arcane, unpublished, and (by implication) mostly ad-hoc techniques developed for a particular application or systems area (compare black magic). VLSI design and compiler code optimisation were (in their beginnings) considered classic examples of black art; as theory developed they became deep magic, and once standard textbooks had been written, became merely heavy wizardry. The huge proliferation of formal and informal channels for spreading around new computer-related technologies during the last twenty years has made both the term "black art" and what it describes less common than formerly. See also voodoo programming. [Jargon File]