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Search Result for "cp/m":

V.E.R.A. -- Virtual Entity of Relevant Acronyms (September 2014):

CPM Communication Processor Module (Motorola)
V.E.R.A. -- Virtual Entity of Relevant Acronyms (September 2014):

CPM Control Program for Microcomputers (OS, DR), "CP/M"
V.E.R.A. -- Virtual Entity of Relevant Acronyms (September 2014):

CPM Cost Per Minute
V.E.R.A. -- Virtual Entity of Relevant Acronyms (September 2014):

CPM Critical Path Method
The Jargon File (version 4.4.7, 29 Dec 2003):

CP/M /C?P?M/, n. [Control Program/Monitor; later retconned to Control Program for Microcomputers] An early microcomputer OS written by hacker Gary Kildall for 8080- and Z80-based machines, very popular in the late 1970s but virtually wiped out by MS-DOS after the release of the IBM PC in 1981. Legend has it that Kildall's company blew its chance to write the OS for the IBM PC because Kildall decided to spend a day IBM's reps wanted to meet with him enjoying the perfect flying weather in his private plane (another variant has it that Gary's wife was much more interested in packing her suitcases for an upcoming vacation than in clinching a deal with IBM). Many of CP/M's features and conventions strongly resemble those of early DEC operating systems such as TOPS-10, OS/8, RSTS, and RSX-11. See MS-DOS, operating system.
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (18 March 2015):

Control Program for Microcomputers CPM CP/M (CP/M) An early microcomputer operating system written by Gary Kildall of Digital Research for 8080 and Zilog Z80-based 8-bit computers. CP/M was very popular in the late 1970s but was virtually wiped out by MS-DOS after the release of the IBM PC in 1981. Many of CP/M's features and conventions strongly resemble those of early DEC operating systems such as TOPS-10, OS/8, RSTS and RSX-11. CP/M might have been the OS for the IBM PC instead of MS-DOS but Kildall wanted to keep control of his creation and only license it to IBM. Big Blue however wanted to own and control it completely. Kildall spent the day IBM's reps wanted to meet him enjoying the perfect flying weather in his private plane. [Did CP/M use the same FAT file system as MS-DOS?] (1996-01-07)